Google Surveys

I have been asked as few times about my opinion on Google Surveys. There is not doubting that there has been a significant amount of conversation on the impact Google Surveys will have the Market Research market. From panel providers to the technology vendors there has been a great amount of rumour and fear.

What strikes me is that like most providers in the research market the breadth of client questions we are looking to answer means that there is no one size fits all and certainly Google, for now, does not have the capability to answer all of the questions posed by the end clients.

Interestingly for me I think the area people have overlooked is the areas of media and advertisement testing, one of the most competitive and sensitive areas within the research market.

Since Susan Wojcicki’s post back in February 2013 I have always broadly assumed that Google’s end game is to provide an low cost way that end clients could validate and test media and ads in market blend this data with the free tracking data already provided.

https://plus.google.com/+SusanWojcicki/posts/41MLEnnwzYV

In the developer area of google you can now find a sentiment engine which enable you to take the survey and model data.

Look at the question Google expects its clients to be able to answer

  • Given a user’s past viewing habits, predict what other movies or products a user might like.
  • Analyze posted comments about your product to determine whether they have a positive or negative tone.
  • Guess how much a user might spend on a given day, given his spending history.

Perhaps its not beyond the realms of anyone at Google to provide an benchmark index of media test against which your ad or media would be tested.

https://developers.google.com/prediction/docs/sentiment_analysis

So my take, rather than us focus on the mechanics of what Google provides, I think we should focus on the questions it would like to answer. For a company that dominates online advertising and owns the largest global video channel perhaps should we be surprised that its focus might be to look at how might look to find a way support those revenue streams.

In certainly has or is building the capabilities to support this. For those global entities for whom media and ad testing is a key revenue stream we might expect some slightly different presentation from Google moving forward.

 

 

 

 

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Graphene nanoribbons could be the savior of Moore’s Law | ExtremeTech


Graphene might finally have a shot at making electronics faster in a slimmed-down nanoribbon format. The trick is to make it with enough precision.

Paul P Roberts‘s insight:

Technology that could drive even smaller more powerful devises

See on www.extremetech.com

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Nanomotors that are controlled, for the first time, inside living cells | KurzweilAI

Penn State University chemists and engineers have, for the first time, placed tiny synthetic motors inside live human cells in a lab, propelled them with ultrasonic waves, and steered them magnetically.

The Penn State nanomotors are the closest so far to a “Fantastic Voyage” concept (without the miniature people).

The nanomotors, which are rocket-shaped gold rods ~300 nanometers in diameter and ~3 microns long, move around inside the cells, spinning and battering against the cell membrane.

The nanomotors are activated by resonant ultrasound operating at ~4 MHz, and show axial propulsion as well as spinning.

 

See on www.kurzweilai.net

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5 Visions For The Consumer Products Of 2030


Bathroom fixtures that monitor your health while you do your business? Check. Kids’ sneakers that harvest their energy? Sure. If these product…

Paul P Roberts‘s insight:

Would like one of the molecular scanner, great way to go shopping 

See on www.fastcoexist.com

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How To Predict The Future

Good article on predicting trends and understanding when technologies bcome feasible for widespread adoption. William Hertling has kept a spreadsheet he uses to predict technology trends for almost 20 years. He uses simple metrics and estimates annual growth rates in performance  to give insight itno when technologies will beocme widely available to the crowd. He argues that once a given technology achieves a cost performance ratio that is accessible to the mass market – thats when certain innovations will almost inevitably occur. Using video streaming, AI and other examples to illustrate his methods – its a great read if you are intereted in exploring future technolgy trends or making bets on tech developments. Click on image or title to learn more.

See on www.feld.com

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